International photojournalism

Chad
The refugees Hotel

Eastern Chad, on the border with Darfur. In the past years, refugees and displaced persons have turned up here in their tens of thousands, fleeing from the war. Many have nothing to their name. They're jobless, starving, and have no food for their children. The few reference points in this vast area
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World
Fire of the Earth

Geologist, volcanologist and photographer Marco Stoppato has been travelling the world for the past 25 years to photograph the spectacular shapes that the Earth's surface can produce, especially when it comes to volcanoes and phenomena related to volcanic activity. Here you can view some examples. M
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Tanzania
An African Queen

Lake Tanganyika is Africa's second largest lake and also the deepest in the heart of the Great Rift Valley. Burton and Speeke travelled its banks while searching for the source of the Nile River. The encounter between Livingstone and Stanley also took place here, where the famous phrase 'Doctor Livi
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Western Sahara
A marathon in the Sahara

The odyssey of the Saharawi peoples dates back to 1976, when Spain moved out of Western Sahara and Morocco occupied it, bombing the local populations. As they wait for a twenty-year-old referendum to take place, the situation is so surreal and stagnant that it's almost impossible to see a way out. T
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Ukraine
Not quite Russia, not quite Europe

Like a human in search of an identity, Kiev hangs suspended in a limbo halfway between its Soviet heritage and vague European ambitions. Capital city of a nation with a troubled political life, from the Orange revolution to the incarceration of former prime minister Julija Tymoshenko, birthplace of
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Greece
Evros, gate and wall of Europe

The new gate to Europe is called Evros, a border area between Turkey and Greece and a river, which every year about 55.000 illegal immigrants from all over the world cross. Algerians, Afghans, Kurds, Nepalis and even Dominicans escaping from their own countries, often from civil war. Despite the acc
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French Polynesia
Searching for paradise

In a 1872 novel, Pierre Loti wrote:"Working is an unknown word in Oceania and for the Tahitian people, the years go by in idleness". These words attracted painter Paul Gaugin's curiosity. With no money and a true yearning for leaving France, one day he came across a leaflet that he found in Paris:
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Thailand
Thai Child Boxing

Thai boxing, or Muay Thai is not stranger to controversy. It's a rough sport that can make Western boxing look like a gentlemen' s hobby. Muay Thai fighters employ punches, kicks, knee and elbows strikes that can incapacitate the opponents. But what is even more controversial is that underage childr
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United States
The Catacombs of Las Vegas

Las Vegas is a mermaid that enchants you with its lights but it is also a living hell for desperate people. Homeless people – whose number raised as a result of the economic crisis- that Sin City prefers not to see, forcing them to live in underground tunnels originally designed as gutters. Catacomb
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Portugal
Lisbon, an artistic garage

Lisbon is becoming one of the most popular cities for young graffiti artists with wide spaces dedicated to these artists where they can express their creativity. Facades of abandoned buildings are literally covered by huge graffiti. However, graffiti writers have recently painted a space unusual eve
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India
Sundarbans - The Hungry Tide

The Sundarbans is the country of The Hungry Tide, as described in Indian writer Amitav Ghosh's acclaimed novel of the same name. This is an area between India and Bangladesh (Bengal), where the Ganges forms the largest delta in the world. It is a region of mangrove forests, islands that appear and d
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Europe
In a stone tower

The tower is their home, their life, often their world, in which they seclude themselves, in voluntary isolation from the rest of the planet. The sea is their companion. Sometimes a dog, or a cat. They talk to the rain, the wind and the swell. Some drink, some drink too much, some are abstemious. So
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New Zealand
The women in black

The Black Ferns are thirty-two women that make New Zealand's national rugby team, the female equivalent of the famous All Blacks. Composed by athletes who are often bulky, heavily muscled, very tattooed and, according to their male counterparts, pretty mean on the field, the team is, as much as the
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Palestine
The Palestinian-Israeli water war

Control over water resources is one of the most fierce and pivotal reasons of conflict between Israel and Palestine. Both for Palestine and Israel the present one has been the worst year since decades. Lake Tiberias is at its lowest level. The Israel water authority fears that - at this rate - the p
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United Arab Emirates
Abu Dhabi - Arabian miracle

Before the discovery of oil in the 1970's, Abu Dhabi was a modest fishing village surrounded by the desert dunes. After a little more than 40 years, the emirate boasts one of the most modern cities in the Arabian peninsula, and most of all the highest percentage of public green, obtained by the desa
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Democratic Republic of Congo
Cops and Robbers

The prison of Bukavu, capital of the province of southern Kivu, suffers from the same disease of many other African prisons: overcrowding, horrific hygienic conditions, absence of food (if not provided by the prisoner's families). To make matters in Bukavu even stranger, is the warders' living condi
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International photojournalism