International photojournalism

Eritrea
Meskel, the bonfire of plenty

"Do you know that Christianity arrived in Eritrea by chance?" explains father Abraha as he watches the Meskel parade. "It disembarked with a group of Syrian merchants who were shipwrecked along the coast of the Red Sea on their way back from India". Today, at least half of the inhabitants in Eritrea
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Libya
War Fishing Boats

Misratah has been under the siege of Qaddafi's troops for three months, and its only channel of communication with free Libya is the sea. The population of Benghazi, with the creativity that characterizes the revolution, has organized a boat line to supply the country's third city with food, medicin
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Uganda
The green heart of Africa

Emerald-green hills, scorched savannahs and sky-blue lakes surrounded by volcanic chains and rain forests as dense as honey. Endless tea and banana plantations, audacious agriculture and sleepy villages suspended on the equator, poised between the dramatic historical vicissitudes of twenty years of
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Jordan
Little Ranias grow up

They're women between 20 and 40 years of age, who live in the cities and don't wear the veil, those who visit coffee shops and shopping centres. They call them the "Rania Generation", because they'll go to any lengths to resemble the queen, copying her clothes and her hairstyle, her natural make-up
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Nigeria
Stories of ordinary slavery

Every year, at least 50,000 girls travel from Nigeria (mostly from Benin City, one of the country's poorest cities) to Europe. A trafficker, with the help of a voodoo, or juju, priest, managed to convince them that a decent job awaits them in the promised land. The journey is often nightmarish, tryi
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Yemen
13 women against Al-Qaeda

In Yemen, thirteen veiled women, dangerous and armed to the teeth, have chosen a life of battles. The enemies are two, terrorism and prejudice, the weapons to combat them, different: for the first, an assault light machine gun, for the second, to exist is enough. For the Yemeni society, chronically
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Afghanistan
Mozart vs. Taliban

A little while ago, the Afghan National Institute of Music opened in Kabul, in a half-destroyed building which is currently being restored. Its founder, Ahmad Sarmast, a famous Afghan musician (and son of the national anthem's composer) returned from exile in Australia with the precise intention to
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Afghanistan
Mens sana in corpore afgano

Lacking other facilities, the athletes in Kabul train in the Olympic Stadium, infamous for having being used for public executions during the Taliban regime. In the structure where adulteresses were stoned to death and opponents of the regime shot, athletes from different events now take turns to sh
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Africa
Flying above the Sahara

An aerial ride over the most beautiful regions of the Sahara. A flying meridian travelled from south to north along routes of sand and wind. Geographic splendours, from Mali to Egypt, across five thousand kilometres of dust, sand, rivers, acrobatic agriculture, archaeology, ghosts towns, volcanoes,
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Senegal
Fight with Koran

Traditional combat is practiced all over middle-west Africa. Rules originate from Roman-Greek combats: the first person to knock out his challenger wins. Wearing magic costumes full of fetish and amulets, the wrestlers enter the arena following the rhythm of djembè drums. The magical element is fund
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Brazil
Florianopolis, Eurobeach

Florianopolis, state of Santa Catarina, southern Brazil. Or, better still, Europe: this is the first impression that the city and the beaches which surround it, give to those who arrive here. Santa Catarina, colonized as from the start of the XIX century by waves of Italians, Azoreans and Germans, i
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Australia
Along the Great Ocean Road

Having returned home from the First World War, three thousand soldiers from Victoria suddenly found themselves jobless. Someone came up with the idea to hire them to finally build a road to connect inland Australia with the coast. This road still exists today and is considered to be one of the most
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Afghanistan
Zero dollar baby

Even women are beginning to fight in Afghanistan. For some time now, the Afghan Olympic committee has been training a dozen young women, hoping to transform them into professional boxers and send them to the Olympics (which is what one of them did at the latest games). Two former Afghan boxing champ
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Afghanistan
Thank God it's friday

As in every Muslim country, Friday is a holiday in Afghanistan. And, if there's a single place in the country where people feel like celebrating it, this is Kabul. Despite the suicide attacks, which hit the city at a depressingly frequent rate, and the perennial state of tension that looms all over
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Saudi Arabia
Bye bye petroleum

What will the Saudi Arabia of the future be like? The reformist and open-minded Arabia of King Abdullah, sovereign for the past four years, or the austere and conservative Arabia of the Muslim Ulema? I tried to imagine it, travelling from the capital,Riyadh, to the desert of the Nabataeans in the no
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Belize
It's a country for old men

As vast as Sardinia but with less than 300 thousand inhabitants, Belize abounds in pensioners who - alone, in small groups or in communities - come to live here more or less definitively. They are snowbirds, those who migrate south when it's cold in the north. Thanks to the white beaches and the con
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International photojournalism